Monday Thots

Monday Thots

There is nothing that invites unsolicited advice quite like being a single women

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How To Quit Your Job To Travel The World, Part 1

How To Quit Your Job To Travel The World, Part 1

Follow along as I begin my travels in Spain!!! (and read more of my stuff at 20some.com)

We’ve all been there, sitting in your office, scrolling through Instagram, BuzzFeed, Elite Daily and viewing picture after picture of beautiful people on the beaches of Italy, coliseums of Greece, or the luxurious streets of Paris. The headlines are screaming out at you – “I quit my job to travel! Here’s how I did it” (insert photo of two girls holding up a peace sign with some ninth Wonder of the World in the background). You think, “Wow this can be me too!”

You eagerly open up the article and begin reading, again thinking “Wow, I can totally do this.”

Here’s how they usually go:

“All it takes is a ton of motivation, a strong will and my parents’ credit card! LOL. We searched kayak.com until we found a great deal! Packed a bag and bought a one-way ticket, from there we worked odd jobs (and blogged along the way) and we were able to travel for one year! No steady job! It hasn’t always been easy but we did it!!”

Cool. I’ve basically learned nothing from this article and I still think it’s virtually impossible to quit my job and travel. So, I’m just going to go back to pretending that I understand excel and actually listen during meetings.

Well, despite these unhelpful resources, I retained the desire to quit my job and live abroad. And I’m here to tell you that, after a lot of my own research and preparation, I’m actually about to do it. But unlike these girls on Instagram who sell tea for a living, I’m a real life person with bills and a dad who will not be letting me use his credit card. I’m also here to tell you that it is possible no matter who you are, but it does take a lot if planning, discipline, and motivation (insert peace sign photo here). Here’s how it works:

 

Step 1: Make the decision and start planning.  

My planning actually began over a year ago. Last summer, I decided that I wanted to travel, spend all my money, then come back to “real life” and get my shit together. So, I started saving a little bit of money to do just that. At this point I had no idea what I was going to do or for how long, but my ideal timeline was three months.

After spending a year abroad in Spain during high school, I knew I wanted to go back. I started researching programs that would allow me to go to Spain for three months (since you only need a tourist visa if you are going to a country for this amount of time). I stumbled upon CIEE — a program that a few of my friends had done after high school. There was a 3-month volunteer program for people right outside of Madrid that allows you to stay with a family and volunteer to teach English at a local school! (aka major money saver.)

I decided this was the program for me, since I definitely want to brush up on my Spanish and start out with a solid home base before my travels. As anyone who has traveled abroad before can tell you, it’s pretty easy to move around Europe once you get there. So I figured I would do the program, then spend maybe a month or two traveling.

Solid plan right!? Maybe. I would still basically be without work for 3 to 5 months with little to no income as I mentioned before. So that brings me to…

 

Step 2: Start REALLY saving money.

Even if you don’t know where you want to go, or for how long, or have any solid plans in mind for a program or a path of travel, start saving $100 – $200 per paycheck, any bonuses, tax returns, whatever — just save, save, save. When you have a solid cushion in your savings, purchasing a one-way plane ticket for $400 doesn’t seem quite so scary.

Now, in lieu of writing a 15-page essay of what I did and how I did it, I’ll treat this more like a guide (and advice column of course) as I go and learn how you all can make it work, too. I’m about a month away from my departure date, so things are getting more real than ever, but I’m also here to tell you that anyone can do it.

If you’re feeling the itch, don’t scratch it by going out and shopping. Save your money. Sure it’s hard, you might not get to accept all those brunch invitations or eat out every weekend, but I’m sure when you’re enjoying a croissant in the Swiss Alps (why not?), you’ll be glad you didn’t try to drink 15 mimosas in 30 minutes with your six drunkest, closest friends.

The eternal struggle

The eternal struggle

I just had lunch with a co-worker of mine and were talking about our lives. I’m about to shoot a web series with an old stella adler friend and she  regularly shoot a series of great videos called 3 in 30 and we were both complaining. I never feel like traveling to GLENDALE FUCKING QUEENS FOR REHEARSAL WHICH IS LITERALLY AN HOUR AWAY FROM MY APARTMENT.

She has trouble often coming up with topics and was asked to do her 3 in 30’s on a radio show and didn’t want to commit to the once a week it would take, but we’re both ready for change.

Is this what people talk about when they don’t want to put in the work? would we rather sit at home applying for acting jobs and dreaming about making it big then when the time comes for the work, not put it in? It’s a very interesting concept and makes you think if more people just got off their asses and did shit maybe we would be more successful as a whole?

Another example, I write for 20some which requires me to just sit and be creative. Maybe move my fingers a little bit? so why do I always act like it’s such a burden. Writing and acting is what I want to do, I would like it to be my job!

Oh wait, maybe that’s why it’s a burden. I dunno.

 

oh dear.